Books as Victims of Erosion: Nature Artistically Carved into Encyclopedia Britannica 1

Inspired by his travels to Ecuador, Peru and Brazil, artist Guy Laramée sculpted a mountain panorama on 24 printed volumes of the Encyclopedia Britannica. First revealed in Edinburgh in 1768, Encyclopedia Britannica formally put a cease to its print model in 2012, after 244 years. This venture- entitled Adieu- marks the ending of the printing course of and, in response to My Modern Met, makes a strong assertion: like so many mountainous landscapes, books and information generally are seemingly the victims of abrasion.

Books as Victims of Erosion: Nature Artistically Carved into Encyclopedia Britannica 2

Laramée explains, “My work, in 3D in addition to in portray, originates from the very concept that final information might very properly be an erosion as an alternative of an accumulation… Mountains of disused information return to what they are surely: mountains. They erode a bit extra they usually grow to be hills. Then they flatten and grow to be fields the place apparently nothing is occurring. Piles of out of date encyclopedias return to that which doesn’t have to say something, that which merely IS.”  Feel free to share your ideas relating to this artwork set up, we might like to know your opinion!

Books as Victims of Erosion: Nature Artistically Carved into Encyclopedia Britannica 3

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